Beef and Broccoli


20 Comments

July 23, 2022

1M+ Views Chinese Main Dishes Recipes Tastier Than Takeout Wok


Beef and Broccoli is one of the most recognizable American Chinese takeout dishes and my version is a favorite amongst family and friends! The beef is super tender and the sauce is salty & sweet – it’s absolutely perfect over a bowl of steamed rice!

Watch the Beef and Broccoli Recipe Video Below!

What makes Beef and Broccoli so delicious?

The wok-seared beef is so juicy and succulent thanks to the baking soda marinade. It’s perfect over some steamed white rice with the fresh broccoli and savory sauce!

I always like to garnish mine with fresh sesame seeds for a perfect weeknight meal that comes together in minutes. The success of this recipe is all in the prep! It’s important to have everything ready to go before you cook the dish in the pan, because the cooking process is extremely quick!

Beef and Broccoli has easily become one of the dishes in the weekly rotation! It’s really a simple combination of the tender marinated flank steak, crisp broccoli, aromatics, and savory umami rich sauce that really brings it all together!

If you are not a big red meat eater, be sure to check out my Chicken & Broccoli recipe!

Marinating Your Beef

Once your steak is sliced thinly against the grain, marinate it with the following ingredients for at least 20 minutes:

  • Baking soda
  • Soy Sauce
  • Oyster Sauce
  • White Pepper
  • Kosher Salt
  • Neutral Oil
  • Cornstarch

The marinated beef should look like this once the ingredients are combined – not too wet and not too dry. It’s the perfect marinade for a quick sear in the wok!

Other Ingredient Tips (and why blanching your broccoli is important!)

INGREDIENTS TIPS

BROCCOLI
I recommend you avoid the pre-cut broccoli and get crowns from the store that you can cut yourself. It’s important that the broccoli is cut to similar sized pieces (1″) so they cook evenly and are distributed equally throughout the dish. I’ve noticed that pre-cut broccoli range widely in size, which will result in some broccoli pieces being under-cooked, while others will be over-cooked.

FLANK STEAK
Make sure you are slicing against the grain. You’ll know which direction the grain is when you look at the meat – the lines will be running in one direction (the lines are the muscle fibers). Slicing against the grain is an easy way to ensure your meat will be tender. (Remember, the lines are the muscle fibers – cutting against the lines means you’re cutting the long fibers, so they don’t get tough when cooked!)

BAKING SODA
This is the KEY ingredient to super tender beef. Baking soda is commonly used in Chinese cooking to tenderize beef. If you’re curious about the science behind it – baking soda neutralizes acid and raises the pH level, which causes the meat to become more alkaline. This means the proteins INSIDE the meat will have more trouble tightening up – when the proteins can’t tighten up, the meat ends up much more tender when cooked (instead of constricting together aka getting tough!)

NEUTRAL OIL
My favorite neutral oil is avocado oil, but you can also use canola or vegetable oil! I don’t use olive oil when cooking Chinese food for two reasons: 1. It has a low burning point and 2. I find that the flavor profile does not usually go with the dish.

WHITE PEPPER
I get asked all the time if you can sub black pepper for white pepper – and my answer is, it depends BUT you need to watch the ratio. White pepper has a milder flavor profile than black pepper, so it’s a 1-1 substitute. I would start with less black pepper and add as you go. (But really, you should have white pepper in your pantry! It’s a staple in mine!)

LIGHT vs. DARK SOY SAUCE
Yes, they’re different! Dark soy sauce is thicker, darker, and sweeter (as well as has a higher sodium content) than regular soy sauce. If you do not have dark soy sauce on hand, you can substitute with oyster sauce.

MSG
As always, this is optional 🙂

CORNSTARCH SLURRY
A cornstarch slurry is a mixture of cornstarch and water that is used in cooking to thicken WITHOUT powdery lumps or additional flavors/colors! This is the secret to so many of your favorite Chinese dishes. My #1 tip is make sure your cornstarch slurry has not separated before adding it in – I always try to re-stir right before! 

RECIPE TIPS

BLANCH YOUR BROCCOLI
I highly recommend blanching your broccoli before using it in a stir-fry (such as this dish) – the 30 seconds in hot water will help soften the vegetable (so it doesn’t take too long to cook in the wok and get inadvertently soggy), brighten the color, and also keep the dish from being overwhelmed by broccoli flavor.

VELVETING
Velveting is a key Chinese cooking technique that involves marinating the protein in cornstarch and various seasonings (such as white pepper, salt, shaoxing wine, and oils) before quickly passing it through hot oil. It’s one of my favorite ways to guarantee moist and tender meat, and it’s a trick that I don’t hear home chefs talk about often. I love incorporating it into my recipes because it’s one of the best ways to make restaurant quality Chinese food at home!

SUCCESS IS IN THE PREP!
Once you start cooking, this recipe will come together very quickly. The key to pulling this off successfully is having all of your ingredients prepped and in bowls right next to your wok or pan! Have your premixed sauce, noodles, and vegetables ready and easily accessible during the cooking process.

beef and broccoli

Beef and Broccoli

A quick and easy Beef and Broccoli that's so much better than takeout!
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Servings 2

Ingredients
 
 

Beef

  • 1 lb flank steak cut into 1/4" strips
  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp white pepper
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tbsp neutral oil I used avocado oil
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch

Sauce

  • 2 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1/2 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 tsp msg optional
  • 3/4 cup chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp shaoxing wine
  • 1/2 tbsp cornstarch

Vegetables

  • 1 lb broccoli cut into 2" pieces
  • 5 cloves garlic chopped
  • 1 tbsp ginger chopped

Instructions
 

  • Slice your beef into 1/4" strips against the grain for maximum tenderness.
  • Marinate beef strips with baking soda, oyster sauce, salt, oil, and cornstarch. Set aside for 15 minutes.
  • In a small bowl, mix together your sauce by combining light soy, dark soy, oyster sauce, sugar, white pepper, sesame oil, msg, shaoxing wine, chicken stock, and cornstarch. This will be your sauce. Set aside.
  • Bring a pot of water to boil and blanch your broccoli 30 seconds; drain and set aside.
  • Add about 4 tbsp of neutral oil to a hot pan. Sear marinated beef strips over high heat for 2-3 minutes until nicely browned. Remove and set aside.
  • In the same pan and oil, fry ginger and and garlic for 15 seconds. Add back your broccoli and stir fry for 30 seconds.
  • Add back the beef followed by the premixed sauce and continue cooking for 1-2 minutes until the sauce has thickened slightly and coated the beef and broccoli.
  • Garnish with sesame seeds. Serve with freshly steamed white rice and enjoy!
Keyword beef, beef and broccoli, broccoli, chinese food, chinese takeout, stir fry
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Recipe Rating




  1. 5 stars
    Loved this recipe! My husband said the best ever Chinese I’ve made. Thank you so much for sharing.

  2. 5 stars
    I just made this after seeing it on TikTok. I’ve never made Chinese food that tastes this good!!! The most “difficult” part was finding the ingredients (I just went to one special store). I’ll be making it again and again.

  3. 5 stars
    It’s such an easy and flavourful dish, and a great week to get the husband to eat broccoli on purpose. It’s become a staple in our weekday dinner rotation.

  4. 5 stars
    This dish is amazing and so easy! Panda Express has really been skimping out on their beef portions so I made this for my wife. I usually never eat brocolli beef and I cannot get enough. This is cheaper, better, and you control how much meat! It also holds ridiculously well for next day leftovers if you leave the brocolli a little crisp.

    With 4 kids I have to make huges batches, so I’m still figuring out the sauce ratio. The first time I made it I don’t think the baking soda portion comment was there, but it turned out fine. I’d guess you can keep the same sauce recipe and cook 4 lbs.

    I’ve also done this with Top round and sirloin and it turns out almost as well as Flank if you want to save some money, or are like me and need to get creative using some of the lesser cuts of the whole cow you bought! I’ve also done batches with Red Chilis and onion to spice it up!

    CJ eats is the best. I’ve started incorporating some of the techniques into other things I cook
    (my wife enjoyed beef fajitas for the first time, usually she never even tries them). Thanks CJ!

    1. It makes me so happy to hear you and your family are enjoying the recipes! Thanks for taking the time to comment and leave a rating! -CJ

  5. 5 stars
    By far the best beef and broccoli recipe I’ve tried. So delicious that even family took home leftovers, and that never happens! Thank you

  6. 5 stars
    If you’re considering making this recipe DO IT. I never leave reviews but this is without a doubt the best beef and broccoli recipe I have ever made. I always wondered how restaurants make the beef so tender and now I know! It was so delicious!

  7. 5 stars
    I made this and it was delicious! The recipe was really easy to follow and I made no changes, it was perfect as is. The beef was really tender. We loved it!

  8. 4 stars
    Made this tonight by prepping ever in the morning and cooking at night. It was very flavorful; however, it probably would have been better in a wok at high heat. Will continue to make it and improve my technique!

  9. Spotted this (and your enthusiastic smile) on Pinterest. I started the beef marinating yesterday, but discovered my broccoli wasn’t “up to snuff.” (I snuffed a bit and it was awful!) I ran out for more broccoli but waited a day.
    SUCH TENDER GREAT FLAVOR in that beef! It wasn’t that tender two weeks before as “steak.” So good even as I ate it with cauliflower rice that went back for seconds! Thanks for upping my beef-broccoli game!